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The UK Resuscitation Council have given guidelines outlining the amount of Adrenaline that needs to be given as an Intramuscular injection by healthcare professionals. First, you need to ensure that you are using the correct sterile needle as described in an earlier video. Also, check that the drug is in date and correct for use.  The guidelines break down dose rates in to 4 age groups: adult, child over 12 years, child between 6 and 12 years and a child under 6 years.

The amounts are as follows:

  • Adults should be given 500 micrograms which is 0.5 milli litre
  • Children over 12 years old should also be given 500 micrograms which is 0.5 milli litre
  • Children between 6 to 12 years should be given 300 micrograms which is 0.3 milli litre
  • Children under 6 years should be given 150 micrograms which is 0.15 milli litre.

These amounts are slightly higher than the dose delivered by an auto injector for older children and adults as they only deliver 300 micrograms. These doses can be repeated after five minutes if there is no response or if the patient's condition has deteriorated. Make sure you keep a record of any drugs given and pass this information on when you hand over the patient for further treatment. 

It is worth checking your supplies of Adrenaline to make sure that they are being stored correctly and aren't expired. Ensure that records are up to date and if you have any doubts, ask your manager or contact your supplier.
There are different policies in different workplaces, so make sure you follow the policies where you work and ask for clarification if you need it. 

Finally, the use of intravenous or IV Adrenaline should only be used by specialists and not in general practice.